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The Greek Word for Hospitality from Kittel's

The block quote is for the Greek word for "hospitality"


ΦΙΛΑΝΘΡΩΠΊΑ PHILANTHRŌPÍA [HOSPITALITY] ,
ΦΙΛΑΝΘΡΏΠΩΣ PHILANTHRṒPŌS [BENEVOLENTLY, KINDLY]



A. The Greek World.



1. Occurrence and Meaning. Found from the fifth century B.C., this group at first denotes friendly relations, especially of the gods or rulers etc. to those under them, then more generally, and with such nuances as “hospitality,” “clemency,” “usefulness,” and “tip” or “present.”


2. The Greek-Hellenistic World. Primarily deities are philánthrōpoi, then rulers and outstanding people, philanthrōpía is a virtue in popular ethics and later in philosophical ethics. Human philanthrōpía imitates that of the gods and is demanded of rulers. Julian regards it as the typical quality of the Hellenes and Romans and requires it of officials and pagan priests. It takes the form of clemency in punishment and aid in distress.


B. The LXX and Hellenistic Judaism.

1. In the LXX the word occurs in apocryphal works with the same senses as in the Greek and Hellenistic tradition (cf. 2 Macc. 9:27; Wis. 12:19).
2. The Epistle of Aristeas argues that rulers can practice it only in obedience to God (208).
3. Josephus calls the generous conduct of the Romans philanthrōpía (Antiquities 12.124). He also refers to God’s philanthrōpía (16.42).
4. Philo integrates the virtue into his thinking (On Virtues 51). The friend of God must also be a philanthrṓpos (On the Decalogue 110). philanthrōpía embraces enemies, slaves, animals, and even plants, as well as compatriots. It determines God’s own actions in creation and in Israel’s history (On the Creation of the World 81; On the Life of Moses 1.198).


C. The NT.

The group is marginal in the NT. The centurion acts philanthrṓpōs when he lets Paul visit friends in Sidon (Acts 27:3), and the inhabitants of Malta show philanthrōpía (aid or hospitality) after the shipwreck (28:2). God’s philanthrōpía comes to expression in the Christ event (Tit. 3:4), i.e., in regeneration and renewal by the Spirit through Christ. God is no remote and alien God but has condescended to us and placed our life under the concrete obedience that issues in right conduct to others (vv. 1ff.).


D. The Early Church.

The early writers also hesitate to make much use of the group. Justin Dialogue 47 refers to the philanthrōpía of God (cf. Diog. 9.2). Acts of Thomas 170 calls Christ philánthrōpos. Clement of Alexandria and Origen begin to use the group more freely both for the work of God or Christ and for Christian conduct.
philoxenía, philóxenos[1]


AppendixBibliography

[1] Geoffrey W. Bromiley, trans., Gerhard Kittel, Gerhard Friedrich, ed., Theological Dictionary of the New Testament: Abridged in One Volume, (Grand Rapids, MI: William B. Eerdmans, 2003), s.v. “,” WORDsearch CROSS e-book.




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Worthy is Lamb Word study on Greek word for Holy

Worthy is the Lamb, Word study on the Greek word translated "Holy" hagiasmos (ἁγιασμός,

This is what we sing when we are approaching God in Worship keeping in mind the Greek word study on the English word "Holy"






HOLINESS, HOLY, HOLILY


A. Nouns.
1. hagiasmos (ἁγιασμός, 38), translated “holiness” in the KJV ofRom. 6:19221 Thess. 4:71 Tim. 2:15Heb. 12:14, is always rendered “sanctification” in the RV. It signifies (a) separation to God, 1 Cor. 1:302 Thess. 2:131 Pet. 1:2; (b) the resultant state, the conduct befitting those so separated, 1 Thess. 4:34,7, and the four other places mentioned above. “Sanctification” is thus the state predetermined by God for believers, into which in grace He calls them, and in which they begin their Christian course and so pursue it. Hence they are called “saints” (hagioi). See SANCTIFICATION.¶
Note: The corresponding verb hagiazo denotes “to set apart to God.” See HALLOW, SANCTIFY.
2. hagiosune (ἁγιωσύνη, 42) denotes the manifestation of the quality of “holiness” in personal conduct; (a) it is used in Rom. 1:4, of the absolute “holiness” of Christ in the days of His flesh, which distinguished Him from all merely human beings; this (which is indicated in the phrase “the spirit of holiness”) and (in vindication of it) His resurrection from the dead, marked Him out as (He was “declared to be”) the Son of God; (b) believers are to be “perfecting holiness in the fear of God,” 2 Cor. 7:1, i.e., bringing “holiness” to its predestined end, whereby (c) they may be found “unblameable in holiness” in the Parousia of Christ, 1 Thess. 3:13
“In each place character is in view, perfect in the case of the Lord Jesus, growing toward perfection in the case of the Christian. Here the exercise of love is declared to be the means God uses to develop likeness to Christ in His children. The sentence may be paraphrased thus:—The Lord enable you more and more to spend your lives in the interests of others, in order that He may so establish you in Christian character now, that you may be vindicated from every charge that might possibly be brought against you at the Judgment-seat of Christ;’ cf. 1 John 4:1617.”*

3. hagiotes (ἁγιότης, 41), “sanctity,” the abstract quality of “holiness,” is used (a) of God,Heb. 12:10; (b) of the manifestation of it in the conduct of the apostle Paul and his fellowlaborers, 2 Cor. 1:12 (in the best mss., for haplotes).¶
4. hosiotes (ὁσιότης, 3742) is to be distinguished from No. 3, as denoting that quality of “holiness” which is manifested in those who have regard equally to grace and truth; it involves a right relation to God; it is used in Luke 1:75 and Eph. 4:24, and in each place is associated with righteousness.¶
Notes: (1) In Acts 3:12, the KJV translates eusebeia, by “holiness,” RV, “godliness,” as everywhere, the true meaning of the word. See GODLINESS. (2) In Titus 2:3, KJV, hieroprepes, which denotes “suited to a sacred character, reverent,” is rendered “as becometh holiness,” RV, “reverent.” See REVERENT.¶

B. Adjectives.
1. hagios (ἅγιος, 40), akin to A, Nos. 1 and 2, which are from the same root as hagnos (found in hazo, “to venerate”), fundamentally signifies “separated” (among the Greeks, dedicated to the gods), and hence, in Scripture in its moral and spiritual significance, separated from sin and therefore consecrated to God, sacred.
(a) It is predicated of God (as the absolutely “Holy” One, in His purity, majesty and glory): of the Father, e.g., Luke 1:49John 17:111 Pet. 1:1516Rev. 4:86:10; of the Son, e.g., Luke 1:35Acts 3:144:27301 John 2:20; of the Spirit, e.g., Matt. 1:18 and frequently in all the Gospels, Acts, Romans, 1 and 2 Cor., Eph., 1 Thess.; also in 2 Tim. 1:14Titus 3:51 Pet. 1:122 Pet. 1:21Jude 20.
(b) It is used of men and things (see below) in so far as they are devoted to God. Indeed the quality, as attributed to God, is often presented in a way which involves divine demands upon the conduct of believers. These are called hagioi, “saints,” i.e., “sanctified” or “holy” ones.
This sainthood is not an attainment, it is a state into which God in grace calls men; yet believers are called to sanctify themselves (consistently with their calling, 2 Tim. 1:9), cleansing themselves from all defilement, forsaking sin, living a “holy” manner of life, 1 Pet. 1:152 Pet. 3:11, and experiencing fellowship with God in His holiness. The saints are thus figuratively spoken of as “a holy temple”, 1 Cor. 3:17 (a local church); Eph. 2:21(the whole Church), cp. 5:27; “a holy priesthood,” 1 Pet. 2:5; “a holy nation,” 2:9.
“It is evident that hagios and its kindred words … express something more and higher than hieros, sacred, outwardly associated with God; … something more than semnos, worthy, honorable; something more than hagnos, pure, free from defilement. Hagios is … more comprehensive.… It is characteristically godlikeness” (G. B. Stevens, in Hastings’ Bib. Dic.).
The adjective is also used of the outer part of the tabernacle, Heb. 9:2 (RV, “the holy place”); of the inner sanctuary, 9:3, RV, “the Holy of Holies”; 9:4, “a holy place,” RV; v. 25 (plural), of the presence of God in heaven, where there are not two compartments as in the tabernacle, all being “the holy place”; 9:8, 12 (neuter plural); 10:19, “the holy place,” RV (KJV, “the holiest,” neut. plural), see SANCTUARY; of the city of Jerusalem.Rev. 11:2; its temple, Acts 6:13; of the faith. Jude 20; of the greetings of saints, 1 Cor. 16:20; of angels, e.g., Mark 8:38; of apostles and prophets, Eph. 3:5; of the future heavenly Jerusalem, Rev. 21:21022:19.
2. hosios (ὅσιος, 3741), akin to A, No. 4, signifies “religiously right, holy,” as opposed to what is unrighteous or polluted. It is commonly associated with righteousness (see A, No. 4). It is used “of God, Rev. 15:416:5; and of the body of the Lord Jesus, Acts 2:27;13:35, citations from Ps. 16:10, Sept.; Heb. 7:26; and of certain promises made to David, which could be fulfilled only in the resurrection of the Lord Jesus, Acts 13:34. In1 Tim. 2:8 and Titus 1:8, it is used of the character of Christians.… In the Sept., hosios frequently represents the Hebrew word chasid, which varies in meaning between ‘holy’ and ‘gracious,’ or ‘merciful;’ cf. Ps. 16:10 with 145:17.”*
Notes: (1) For Acts 13:34, see the RV and the KJV marg.; the RV in Rev. 16:5, “Thou Holy One,” translates the most authentic mss. (KJV “and shalt be”). (2) For hieros (see No. 1), subserving a sacred purpose, translated “holy” in 2 Tim. 3:15, KJV (of the Scriptures), see SACRED.

C. Adverb.
hosios (ὁσίως, 3743), akin to A, No. 4, and B, No. 2, “holily,” i.e., pure from evil conduct, and observant of God’s will, is used in 1 Thess. 2:10, of the conduct of the apostle and his fellow missionaries.¶

D. Verb.
hagiazo (ἁγιάζω, 37), “to hallow, sanctify,” in the passive voice, “to be made holy, be sanctified,” is translated “let him be made holy” in Rev. 22:11, the aorist or point tense expressing the definiteness and completeness of the divine act; elsewhere it is rendered by the verb “to sanctify.” See HALLOW, SANCTIFY.


Appendix / Bibliography


Vine, W. E., Unger, M. F., & White, W., Jr. (1996). Vine’s Complete Expository Dictionary of Old and New Testament Words (Vol. 2, pp. 307–308). Nashville, TN: T. Nelson.

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Jesus Paid it All I looked up Sin in Vines!

       Jesus Paid it All      I looked up Sin in Vines!


             Jesus Paid It All
           Author:      Elvina M. Hall
         Composer:      John T. Grape
         Tune:      All to Christ (Grape)
         Scripture:      1 Peter 2:24; 1 Cor 7:23

    1      I hear the Savior say,
    ‘Thy strength indeed is small,
    Child of weakness watch and pray,
    Find in Me thine all in all.’

    2      Lord, now indeed I find
    Thy pow’r and Thine alone,
    Can change the leper’s spots
    And melt the heart of stone.

    3      For nothing good have I
    Whereby Thy grace to claim;
    I’ll wash my garments white
    In the blood of Calv’ry’s Lamb.

    4    And when, before the throne,
    I stand in Him complete,
    ‘Jesus died my soul to save,’
    My lips shall still repeat.

    Chorus      Jesus paid it all,
    All to Him I owe;
    Sin had left a crimson stain,
    He washed it white as snow.[1]


1 Cor 7:23


You were bought   with a price [2] 
              agorazō             timē

                   59                5092



1 Cor7:23 For you were bought at a price In Paul’s time, masters purchased slaves from other masters, thereby issuing a change in ownership for a slave. Paul reminds the Corinthians that God purchased them from slavery to sin and death through the sacrificial death of Christ. Therefore, they belong to God, not to themselves (1 Cor 6:13; compare Gal 2:19–20).[3]






 1 Peter 2:24 

He 

himself

bore

our

sins

in

his

body

on

the

tree
that

we

                   os
autos
pherō
egō
amartanō
en
autos
o sōma
epi
o
xylon
ina

                  3739
846
399
2257
3588 266
1722
846
3588 4983
1909
3588
3586
2443


might

die

to

sin

and

live

to 

righteousness
By

his

wounds

you


ginomai

amartanō

zaō

o dikē

os
o mōlōps


581

3588 266

2198

3588 1343

3739
3588 3468

have 

been

 healed[4]


iaomai


2390



Treasury - 1 Peter 2:24
(New American Standard Bible (1995 Update))

his own self
Ex 28:38 — "It shall be on Aaron's forehead, and Aaron shall take away the iniquity of the holy things which the sons of Israel consecrate, with regard to all their holy gifts; and it shall always be on his forehead, that they may be accepted before the LORD.

Lev 16:22 — "The goat shall bear on itself all their iniquities to a solitary land; and he shall release the goat in the wilderness.

Lev 22:9 — 'They shall therefore keep My charge, so that they will not bear sin because of it and die thereby because they profane it; I am the LORD who sanctifies them.

Nu 18:22 — "The sons of Israel shall not come near the tent of meeting again, or they will bear sin and die.

Ps 38:4 — For my iniquities are gone over my head; As a heavy burden they weigh too much for me.

Isa 53:4-6 — Surely our griefs He Himself bore, And our sorrows He carried; Yet we ourselves esteemed Him stricken, Smitten of God, and afflicted. 5 But He was pierced through for our transgressions, He was crushed for our iniquities; The chastening for our well-being fell upon Him, And by His scourging we are healed. 6 All of us like sheep have gone astray, Each of us has turned to his own way; But the LORD has caused the iniquity of us all To fall on Him.

Isa 53:11 — As a result of the anguish of His soul, He will see it and be satisfied; By His knowledge the Righteous One, My Servant, will justify the many, As He will bear their iniquities.

Mt 8:17 — This was to fulfill what was spoken through Isaiah the prophet: "HE HIMSELF took our infirmities and CARRIED away our diseases."

Jn 1:29 — The next day he *saw Jesus coming to him and *said, "Behold, the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world!

Heb 9:28 — so Christ also, having been offered once to bear the sins of many, will appear a second time for salvation without reference to sin, to those who eagerly await Him.

on
Dt 21:22 — "If a man has committed a sin worthy of death and he is put to death, and you hang him on a tree,

Dt 21:23 — his corpse shall not hang all night on the tree, but you shall surely bury him on the same day (for he who is hanged is accursed of God), so that you do not defile your land which the LORD your God gives you as an inheritance.

Ac 5:30 — "The God of our fathers raised up Jesus, whom you had put to death by hanging Him on a cross.

Ac 10:39 — "We are witnesses of all the things He did both in the land of the Jews and in Jerusalem. They also put Him to death by hanging Him on a cross.

Ac 13:29 — "When they had carried out all that was written concerning Him, they took Him down from the cross and laid Him in a tomb.

Gal 3:13 — Christ redeemed us from the curse of the Law, having become a curse for us—for it is written, "CURSED is everyone who hangs on A TREE"

being
1Pe 4:1 — Therefore, since Christ has suffered in the flesh, arm yourselves also with the same purpose, because he who has suffered in the flesh has ceased from sin,

1Pe 4:2 — so as to live the rest of the time in the flesh no longer for the lusts of men, but for the will of God.

Ro 6:2 — May it never be! How shall we who died to sin still live in it?

Ro 6:7 — for he who has died is freed from sin.

Ro 6:11 — Even so consider yourselves to be dead to sin, but alive to God in Christ Jesus.

Ro 7:6 — But now we have been released from the Law, having died to that by which we were bound, so that we serve in newness of the Spirit and not in oldness of the letter.

Col 2:20 — If you have died with Christ to the elementary principles of the world, why, as if you were living in the world, do you submit yourself to decrees, such as,

Col 3:3 — For you have died and your life is hidden with Christ in God.

2Co 6:17 — "Therefore, COME out from their midst and be separate," says the Lord. "AND DO NOT TOUCH what is unclean; And I will welcome you.

Heb 7:26 — For it was fitting for us to have such a high priest, holy, innocent, undefiled, separated from sinners and exalted above the heavens;

live
Mt 5:20 — "For I say to you that unless your righteousness surpasses that of the scribes and Pharisees, you will not enter the kingdom of heaven.

Lk 1:74 — To grant us that we, being rescued from the hand of our enemies, Might serve Him without fear,

Lk 1:75 — In holiness and righteousness before Him all our days.

Ac 10:35 — but in every nation the man who fears Him and does what is right is welcome to Him.

Ro 6:11 — Even so consider yourselves to be dead to sin, but alive to God in Christ Jesus.

Ro 6:16 — Do you not know that when you present yourselves to someone as slaves for obedience, you are slaves of the one whom you obey, either of sin resulting in death, or of obedience resulting in righteousness?

Ro 6:22 — But now having been freed from sin and enslaved to God, you derive your benefit, resulting in sanctification, and the outcome, eternal life.

Eph 5:9 — (for the fruit of the Light consists in all goodness and righteousness and truth),

Php 1:11 — having been filled with the fruit of righteousness which comes through Jesus Christ, to the glory and praise of God.

1Jn 2:29 — If you know that He is righteous, you know that everyone also who practices righteousness is born of Him.

1Jn 3:7 — Little children, make sure no one deceives you; the one who practices righteousness is righteous, just as He is righteous;

by
Isa 53:5 — But He was pierced through for our transgressions, He was crushed for our iniquities; The chastening for our well-being fell upon Him, And by His scourging we are healed.

Isa 53:6 — All of us like sheep have gone astray, Each of us has turned to his own way; But the LORD has caused the iniquity of us all To fall on Him.

Mt 27:26 — Then he released Barabbas for them; but after having Jesus scourged, he handed Him over to be crucified.

Mk 15:15 — Wishing to satisfy the crowd, Pilate released Barabbas for them, and after having Jesus scourged, he handed Him over to be crucified.

Jn 19:1 — Pilate then took Jesus and scourged Him.

healed
Ps 147:3 — He heals the brokenhearted And binds up their wounds.

Mal 4:2 — "But for you who fear My name, the sun of righteousness will rise with healing in its wings; and you will go forth and skip about like calves from the stall.

Lk 4:18 — "THE SPIRIT of the LORD is upon ME, BECAUSE HE ANOINTED ME TO PREACH the gospel to the poor. HE HAS SENT ME TO PROCLAIM release to the captives, AND RECOVERY of sight to the blind, TO SET free those who are oppressed,

Rev 22:2 — in the middle of its street. On either side of the river was the tree of life, bearing twelve kinds of fruit, yielding its fruit every month; and the leaves of the tree were for the healing of the nations. 



2:24 who himself bore our sins in his body Peter employs Isa 53:3–4 and 53:12 to identify Jesus’ death and resurrection as the ultimate fulfillment of the Suffering Servant’s vicarious sacrifice. On the cross, Christ bore our sins in His body (compare Deut 21:23) even though He was innocent and therefore undeserving of the suffering (see 1 Pet 2:23; compare Isa 53:10). For Peter, Christ’s suffering on our behalf serves as the ethical basis for believers to turn away from sin and live righteous lives.

die to sins and live to righteousness This seems to evoke Isa 53:11’s remark that it is because of the Suffering Servant’s righteousness, even unto death—as the guilt offering for all of humanity—that people can be declared righteous before God (see Isa 53:10 and note; compare 2 Pet 1:1 and note). Peter also indicates that Jesus, as the Suffering Servant, bore the iniquities of humanity and carried people’s sin.

whose wounds you were healed This phrase also comes from Isaiah’s fourth servant song (see Isa 53:5 and note). In its original context the bruises of the Suffering Servant bring healing to transgressors—those who are sinful and rebel against Yahweh (Isa 53:6; compare Isa 6:10; 61:1–11; Luke 4:16–20).[5]


SIN (Noun and Verb)

A. Nouns.

1. hamartia (ἁμαρτία, 266) is, lit., “a missing of the mark,” but this etymological meaning is largely lost sight of in the NT. It is the most comprehensive term for moral obliquity. It is used of “sin” as (a) a principle or source of action, or an inward element producing acts, e.g., Rom. 3:9; 5:12, 13, 20; 6:1, 2; 7:7 (abstract for concrete); 7:8 (twice), 9, 11, 13, “sin, that it might be shown to be sin,” i.e., “sin became death to me, that it might be exposed in its heinous character”: in the last clause, “sin might become exceeding sinful,” i.e., through the holiness of the Law, the true nature of sin was designed to be manifested to the conscience;
(b) a governing principle or power, e.g., Rom. 6:6, “(the body) of sin,” here “sin” is spoken of as an organized power, acting through the members of the body, though the seat of “sin” is in the will (the body is the organic instrument); in the next clause, and in other passages, as follows, this governing principle is personified, e.g., Rom. 5:21; 6:12, 14, 17; 7:11, 14, 17, 20, 23, 25; 8:2; 1 Cor. 15:56; Heb. 3:13; 11:25; 12:4; Jas. 1:15 (2nd part);
(c) a generic term (distinct from specific terms such as No. 2 yet sometimes inclusive of concrete wrong doing, e.g., John 8:21, 34, 46; 9:41; 15:22, 24; 19:11); in Rom. 8:3, “God, sending His own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh,” lit., “flesh of sin,” the flesh stands for the body, the instrument of indwelling “sin” [Christ, preexistently the Son of God, assumed human flesh, “of the substance of the Virgin Mary”; the reality of incarnation was His, without taint of sin (for homoioma, “likeness,” see LIKENESS)], and as an offering for sin,” i.e., “a sin offering” (so the Sept., e.g., in Lev. 4:32; 5:6, 7, 8, 9), “condemned sin in the flesh,” i.e., Christ, having taken human nature, “sin” apart (Heb. 4:15), and having lived a sinless life, died under the condemnation and judgment due to our “sin”; for the generic sense see further, e.g., Heb. 9:26; 10:6, 8, 18; 13:11; 1 John 1:7, 8; 3:4 (1st part; in the 2nd part, “sin” is defined as “lawlessness,” RV), 8, 9; in these verses the KJV use of the verb to commit is misleading; not the committal of an act is in view, but a continuous course of “sin,” as indicated by the RV, “doeth.” The apostle’s use of the present tense of poieo, “to do,” virtually expresses the meaning of prasso, “to practice,” which John does not use (it is not infrequent in this sense in Paul’s Epp., e.g., Rom. 1:32, RV; 2:1; Gal. 5:21; Phil. 4:9); 1 Pet. 4:1 (singular in the best texts), lit., “has been made to cease from sin,” i.e., as a result of suffering in the flesh, the mortifying of our members, and of obedience to a Savior who suffered in flesh. Such no longer lives in the flesh, “to the lusts of men, but to the will of God”; sometimes the word is used as virtually equivalent to a condition of “sin,” e.g., John 1:29, “the sin (not sins) of the world”; 1 Cor. 15:17; or a course of “sin,” characterized by continuous acts, e.g., 1 Thess. 2:16; in 1 John 5:16 (2nd part) the RV marg., is probably to be preferred, “there is sin unto death,” not a special act of “sin,” but the state or condition producing acts; in v. 17, “all unrighteousness is sin” is not a definition of “sin” (as in 3:4), it gives a specification of the term in its generic sense;
(d) a sinful deed, an act of “sin,” e.g., Matt. 12:31; Acts 7:60; Jas. 1:15 (1st part); 2:9; 4:17; 5:15, 20; 1 John 5:16 (1st part).
Notes: (1) Christ is predicated as having been without “sin” in every respect, e.g., (a), (b), (c) above, 2 Cor. 5:21 (1st part); 1 John 3:5; John 14:30; (d) John 8:46; Heb. 4:15; 1 Pet. 2:22. (2) In Heb. 9:28 (2nd part) the reference is to a “sin” offering. (3) In 2 Cor. 5:21, “Him … He made to be sin” indicates that God dealt with Him as He must deal with “sin,” and that Christ fulfilled what was typified in the guilt offering. (4) For the phrase “man of sin” in 2 Thess. 2:3, see INIQUITY, No. 1. 
2. hamartema (ἁμάρτημα, 265), akin to No. 1, denotes “an act of disobedience to divine law” [as distinct from No. 1 (a), (b), (c)]; plural in Mark 3:28; Rom. 3:25; 2 Pet. 1:9, in some texts; sing. in Mark 3:29 (some mss. have krisis, KJV, “damnation”); 1 Cor. 6:18.¶
Notes: (1) For paraptoma, rendered “sins” in the KJV in Eph. 1:7; 2:5; Col. 2:13 (RV, “trespass”), see TRESPASS. In Jas. 5:16, the best texts have No. 1 (RV, “sins”). (2) For synonymous terms see DISOBEDIENCE, ERROR, FAULT, INIQUITY, TRANSGRESSION, UNGODLINESS.



B. Adjective. 

anamartetos (ἀναμάρτητος, 361), “without sin” (a, negative, n, euphonic, and C, No. 1), is found in John 8:7.¶ In the Sept., Deut. 29:19.¶



C. Verbs. 

1. hamartano (ἁμαρτάνω, 264), lit., “to miss the mark,” is used in the NT (a) of “sinning” against God, (1) by angels, 2 Pet. 2:4; (2) by man, Matt. 27:4; Luke 15:18, 21 (heaven standing, by metonymy, for God); John 5:14; 8:11; 9:2, 3; Rom. 2:12 (twice); 3:23; 5:12, 14, 16; 6:15; 1 Cor. 7:28 (twice), 36; 15:34; Eph. 4:26; 1 Tim. 5:20; Titus 3:11; Heb. 3:17; 10:26; 1 John 1:10; in 2:1 (twice), the aorist tense in each place, referring to an act of “sin”; on the contrary, in 3:6 (twice), 8, 9, the present tense indicates, not the committal of an act, but the continuous practice of “sin” [see on A, No. 1 (c)]; in 5:16 (twice) the present tense indicates the condition resulting from an act, “unto death” signifying “tending towards death”; (b) against Christ, 1 Cor. 8:12; (c) against man, (1) a brother, Matt. 18:15, RV, “sin” (KJV, “trespass”); v. 21; Luke 17:3, 4, RV, “sin” (KJV, “trespass”); 1 Cor. 8:12; (2) in Luke 15:18, 21, against the father by the Prodigal Son, “in thy sight” being suggestive of befitting reverence; (d) against Jewish law, the Temple, and Caesar, Acts 25:8, RV, “sinned” (KJV, “offended”); (e) against one’s own body, by fornication, 1 Cor. 6:18; (f) against earthly masters by servants, 1 Pet. 2:20, RV, “(when) ye sin (and are buffeted for it),” KJV, “(when ye be buffeted) for your faults,” lit., “having sinned.”¶
2. proamartano (προαμαρτάνω, 4258), “to sin previously” (pro, “before,” and No. 1), occurs in 2 Cor. 12:21; 13:2, RV in each place, “have sinned heretofore” (so KJV in the 2nd; in the 1st, “have sinned already”).¶[6]

In conclusion this project is about an entire part of systematic theology called "Hamartiology" which means the theology of Sin

Hodge wrote a Systematic Theology Textbook that lists Sin as a part of Anthropology so he does not use Hamartiology in the table of contents but devotes this chapter with all these pages to the subject: 
  • Chapter VIII: Sin 
  • 1. The Nature of the Question to be Considered 
  • 2. Philosophical Theories of the Nature of Sin 
  • 3. The Doctrine of the Early Church 
  • 4. Pelagian Theory 
  • 5. Augustinian Doctrine 
  • 6. Doctrine of the Church of Rome 
  • 7. Protestant Doctrine of Sin 
  • 8. The Effects of Adam’s Sin Upon His Posterity 
  • 9. Immediate Imputation 
  • 10. Mediate Imputation 
  • 11. Preëxistence 
  • 12. Realistic Theory
  • 13. Original Sin 
  • 14. The Seat of Original Sin 
  • 15. Inability     [7]
 We as Christians can be glad about the issue of Sin and the way that we have chosen to take in order for the Sin issue to be permanently resolved by Accepting the finished work of our Savior Jesus Christ as our substitute sacrificial Lamb of God.

Appendix / Bibliography

[1] Logos Hymnal. (1995). (1st edition.). Oak Harbor, WA: Logos Research Systems, Inc.

[2] The Revised Standard Version. (1971). (1 Co 7:23). Oak Harbor, WA: Logos Research Systems, Inc.

[3] Barry, J. D., Mangum, D., Brown, D. R., Heiser, M. S., Custis, M., Ritzema, E., … Bomar, D. (2012, 2016). Faithlife Study Bible (1 Co 7:23 referred back to note about 1 Co 6:20). Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press.

.[4] The Revised Standard Version. (1971). (1 Pe 2:24). Oak Harbor, WA: Logos Research Systems, Inc.

[5] Treasury of Scripture Knowledge Copyright: Publisher: Ephesians Four Group  
TREASURY OF SCRIPTURE KNOWLEDGE THE EPHESIANS FOUR GROUP  For the latest information and announcements of new books visit E4 on the web at: www.FreeBibleSoftware.com THE EPHESIANS FOUR GROUP P.O.BOX 1505 ESCONDIDO, CA 92033 Voice: 760.839.9300 Fax: 603.676.7144 Web: www.FreeBibleSoftware.com The electronic text is COPYRIGHT 1997 by Online Bible. This classic Bible study help gives you a concordance, chain-reference system with over 1,000,000 cross references, topical Bible, and commentary all in one! It goes phrase by phrase through the whole Bible giving you relevant cross references for each phrase handled, which allows you to instantly search any Bible passage and find chapter synopses, key word cross-references, topical references, parallel passages, and illustrative notes that show how the Bible comments on itself. WORDsearch CROSS e-book.

[5] Barry, J. D., Mangum, D., Brown, D. R., Heiser, M. S., Custis, M., Ritzema, E., … Bomar, D. (2012, 2016). Faithlife Study Bible (1 Pe 2:24). Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press.

[6] Vine, W. E., Unger, M. F., & White, W., Jr. (1996). Vine’s Complete Expository Dictionary of Old and New Testament Words (Vol. 2, pp. 576–577). Nashville, TN: T. Nelson.

[7] Hodge’s Systematic Theology, Volumes 1–3 Electronic Edition STEP Files Copyright © 2007, QuickVerse. All rights reserved. 


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